The Rossiter Report – Volume 3: Number 3 – “Crossing the Line in Getting to Yes””

The Rossiter Report – Volume 3; Number 3

By Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

“Crossing the Line in Getting to Yes”

Kitten trying to get at a goldfish

“What part of No don’t you understand? “

As our understanding of the marketing process deepens and we hone our approach to helping our clients unlock what they truly want and need, business owners are bombarded with experts telling them that a customer’s “no” is really an invitation to proceed with the sales pitch; that a potential client doesn’t really know his or her own mind (or the state of his or her budget) so it is up to the business owner to push past the rejection and lead a prospect to acceptance – to “yes”. I hope that some small part of those of you who are reading this is recoiling and feeling uncomfortable. Why would I hope this for you when helping someone to a better way is a good thing? Perhaps the following recounting of an experience I just had while trying to run errands at the mall will help.

It was a typically clichéd gloriously sunny mid-winter day. I was happy, energized, and excited in my productivity as I emerged into the main corridor of the mall through the revolving doors and headed towards my appointment at the tech store. After having traversed barely 100 feet, a well-dressed young man approached me, product in hand, (making direct eye contact and holding it) and asked me for a moment of my time. As I have experienced this approach before and truly did not have the time to spend, or the desire to purchase this particular product, I politely declined stating that I did not have the time. The young man nodded acquiescence, smiling the smile of one who has heard this line before as I breezed past him on my way to my appointment. I was relieved at the apparent success I had won and was feeling rather triumphant in my newly gained skill at deflecting unwanted attention.

My relief and triumphal pride were short-lived. Realizing that I had to pass the same kiosk on the way out of the mall, I armed myself with the same response and firmness of delivery that I had utilized earlier. As I approached the kiosk, the same young man locked his gaze on me and proceeded on the same tack as before, this time with a similarly fortified firmness as I. In response to my honest deflection stating the lack of time in my schedule, the young man took hold of my hand, proceeded to examine my newly acquired manicure, slathering his product all over my hand destroying my manicure in the process (which I had done for an appointment with a client following the completion of my errands). My attempts to take my hand away were rebuffed firmly yet with a smile as he continued his sales pitch in the face of my increasingly firm objections and rejection. When he had finished, allowing me to go on my way without a sale, I could feel nothing but repugnance at having been forced to comply with the salesman’s demands against my express wishes to the contrary. There are several words for this type of behavior, depending on the type of demand made – extortion, coercion, rape, etc. PLEASE NOTE: all of these terms describe criminal behavior. Do not let this scenario become part of your sales or service repertoire.

With the pressure to improve one’s Bottom Line continually, it is easy to see how easy it is to grasp desperately for the sale. Under this pressure, it is easy to cross the fine line between guiding a potential purchaser and mugging that same person for the money in his wallet. To keep things in perspective, keep these things in mind:

  • It is a fatal mistake to think of your potential clients as Prospects. The instant you take the humanity out of the interaction, is the instant you shut down your ability to have a relationship with anyone who purchases from you. Miners go prospecting for cold, hard, inanimate objects. Although these inanimate objects are valuable, once they are obtained, they are forgotten in the quest for another similar or better object. The Prospector misses out on the satisfaction that the Gem Cutter experiences in getting to know the raw stone well enough to be able to gently yet precisely chip away the pieces that detract from the stone’s true beauty. The Prospector, having sold his nugget to the highest bidder, completely misses out on the joy of painstakingly polishing away the cloudiness to reveal only brilliant light reflecting off all the newly revealed facets. The tragedy of the Prospector is that he never becomes part of bringing his acquisition to life. He misses out on experiencing the fullness of a relationship with his discovery; he is on a never-ending search for lifeless nuggets rather than on a continual journey to discover more light and life from each nugget.

My experience has shown me that the businesses with the most vibrant Bottom Lines capable of sustaining themselves are those who choose, through their sales process, to be Gem Cutters searching for the rough jewel to nurture into brilliance. By focusing your sales attention on developing an honest, genuine relationship with each client and potential client through consistently applying the Three C’s of Superlative Service (TM) (Consciousness, Compassion, and Communication), you transition from the role of Prospector into the role of Gem Cutter, searching deep into the heart of each person who has come to you as the solution to his or her problem. The deeper you look into the rough stone that is your client (or potential client), the more thoroughly you will be able to solve the problem presented. Moreover, you will uncover new ways in which you may serve him or her, thereby increasing his or her value to you as well as your value to him or her.

The prospector’s job is an important one because without his efforts, the rough gem would remain buried. The critical steps here are to prospect with the heart of a Gem Cutter then transition into the role of Gem Cutter once the Prospector’s job is completed.

  • When faced with rejection (be it in the form of, “I can’t afford it,”, “I don’t have the time,”, etc.) and the potential client hasn’t hung up or walked away (as I should have done with the manicure-in-a-bottle situation), ask for permission to contact him or her at an agreed upon time that is more convenient. If you are still faced with rejection, gauge the situation to determine if setting the conversation further out (a month or so) would be acceptable. If rejection is still the order of the day, apologize for delaying him or her and send your still potential client off with wishes for a wonderful day. Anything more than this creates a sense of having been attacked and violated (as I felt by the manicure-in-a-bottle man). As soon as you make a potential client or client feel attacked or violated, you have lost them, possibly forever, doing everything in his or her power to escape.
  • When listening to advice on how to attract more clients and initiate more sales, pay attention to the following:

o    What sort of language does the author/speaker use to refer to clients? Is it cold, distant, and dehumanizing or filled with dignity, respect, and humanity?

o    How does the author’s/speaker’s approach make YOU feel? Does it leave you feeling calm and energized or does it leave you clamoring for a good scrub-down and full of stress? This is also how your potential clients and existing clients will feel.

o    Does the author’s/speaker’s approach fill you with pride and excitement about meeting potential clients and converting them into purchasing fans , or are you filled with dread and loathing at the thought of another contact in the manner advised?

If the sales advice you are entertaining does not make you feel like a respected Human Being, then it will not make your potential clients or existing clients feel any other way. If the approach feels wrong, it is wrong for you. The best sales happen when you are authentic (true to who you are), genuine in your desire to help solve the problem, and connected to the person you are trying to help (the Three C’s of Superlative Service (TM) in a nutshell). With these thoughts in the forefront of every client interaction, you will never have to worry about crossing the line again.

 

 

Copyright © 2014 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

The Rossiter Report – Volume 3; Number 2 – “Brown Grass – How I Came to See the Light”

The Rossiter Report – Volume 3; Number 2

By Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

“Brown Grass – How I Came to See the Light”

boy looking through binoculars

“There are none so blind as those who refuse to see.” – Old Proverb –

Gazing out upon the nearly-full tidal pool at the Plum Island Wildlife Refuge in Newburyport, Massachusetts on this unseasonably warm, early April day, I see brown. The parking lot in which I sit, writing, is at a slightly higher elevation than the tidal pool and the adjoining fields of marsh grasses. This vantage point affords enough of an aerial view to see partially over the hillocks in the near distance, across the harbor to the towns of Essex and Ipswich on the horizon. This bird’s-eye view (albeit that of a bird perched on a very low tree branch or a parking sign) places my vision above the fields of newly mown marsh grasses to see dozens of acres of brown. Even the tidal pool is cast with brown in the harsh light of the noon sun.

Very few people stop here for more than thirty seconds. To them, it is just a brown and lifeless landscape; boring. The only people who stay for any length of time beyond the thirty second mark are those birdwatchers who stay only long enough to spot (then consequently check-off) a new bird on their list, with no intention of actually observing the bird and getting to know it. What astounds me is the wealth of beauty that this spot possesses and is missed by those who come in search of a pre-determined idea of what is worthy of notice.

A few years ago (wink, wink) when I was eight years old, I ventured into the kitchen after viewing my Saturday morning cartoons and stood next to my mother at the kitchen sink. “Mumma, I’m bored,” I announced. In her characteristic, gentle firmness, yet in an uncharacteristically direct tone, my mother looked down at me (without skipping a beat in the washing of the breakfast dishes) and said, “Cathleen. The only people who get bored are boring people,” returning her gaze to the garden while continuing with the dishes. Not only was I NEVER bored again, but also this experience taught me to seek out continually something new. A treasure or lesson could be waiting for me in the haphazard pattern of a first coat of paint on the front of a dresser; or the way a reed bends and sings in the midst of a storm yet never breaks; or the fact that the overriding expanse of brown before me is, in point of fact, made up of greens, reds, purples, yellows, and blues in myriad variations on a theme.

The same thing is true of the people we hire and the customers who purchase from us. Without the individual talents, viewpoints, and insights each one brings to the table (the painter’s palette, as it were), then the work of art we call our company or team would lack the depth, luster, and uniqueness that makes our work a masterpiece.

Consciousness is a choice. Simply wanting to be aware does not make it happen. One must choose to open one’s eyes and mind. One must choose to see everything, not only what is pleasant or comfortable.

The thing that changed for me on that Saturday morning so many years ago is that I decided to stop refusing to see the world in front of me. I became determined to remain blind no longer. This choice of consciousness has brought a depth, richness, and joy to my life and work that I have carried with me to every aspect of my life, particularly in relation to the people I encounter. I choose to uncover the layers of wealth and richness buried in each person in front of me at any given time so as to bring the very best to the relationship, project, team, or circumstance. In doing so I find no need for the all-too-standard jealousy, defensiveness, and subsequent subterfuge that plagues Cubicle Farms around the world. Allowing for the enrichment of the team with the free-flow of each other’s talents, insights, and experience (as opposed to the general practice of trying to control and suppress it all) creates an infectious dynamic among the team members that creates a pride in the work and an enthusiasm to produce the best; to be a part of the best. I, for one, would much rather spend the 10+ hours each day that I am at work in the quest to produce the best, to be part of the best in a lively, dynamic environment. When one ponders the alternative, which is what one has become all-too-used-to in the working environment, one wonders why one hasn’t seen the light sooner.

 

Copyright © 2014 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

The Rossiter Report – Volume 3: Number 1 – “The Story of the Lovely Little House – A Cautionary Tale”

“The Story of the Lovely Little House – A Cautionary Tale”

By Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

The Lovely Little House

Once upon a time, there was a lovely little house set on a lovely little lot amid a lovely little garden. The owner worked hard to acquire the land, carefully plan the layout of the house and garden, and paid painstaking attention to detail during the building process. When the house was complete, all the other houses paled in comparison. For a long time, the owner put a great deal of effort into this lovely little house, increasing its value all the while.

After many years of the bliss that comes from careful attention to detail, the owner of this lovely little house began to spend less and less time nurturing his once-beloved asset. The owner began to focus his attention on other, newer acquisitions (of which there were many) that he felt would provide him greater satisfaction. These newer houses were bigger and had all the newest features. Naturally, they were more deserving of his attention, he told himself. Sadly, as the owner continued in his pattern of neglect, the lovely little house set on the lovely little lot amid the lovely little garden began to show the signs of being ignored. Eventually, the owner’s disregard prompted others to take an interest in the once-lovely little house set on the once-lovely little lot amid the once-lovely little garden. These others remembered just how lovely this asset used to be and began to work to acquire it for themselves.

One day, one of these others came along and acquired the once-lovely little house set upon the once-lovely little lot amid the once-lovely little garden (for much less than the first owner invested) and began to nurture it back to its former glory, adding personal touches along the way. He truly valued this asset as well as all the others he had acquired, treating them all with equal care. As a result of this care, the new owner never lost an asset he did not choose to give up.

Not so for the previous owner.  He spent everything he had trying to acquire new houses to make up for the ones he kept losing because they fell into his cycle of neglect. Sadly, contrary to what a wiser person would have done, he never longed for the lovely little house set on the lovely little lot amid the lovely little garden that had brought him so much pleasure and satisfaction in the beginning. Sadly, he never saw the value in his current possessions; therefore, he never maintained them. In the end, he lost them all.

Copyright © 2014 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

The Rossiter Report – V2;N2 – “Breaking Out of the Chicken Farm”

The Rossiter Report – Volume 2;Number 2

by Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

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“Breaking Out of the Chicken Farm”

Chicken

Ginger: So laying eggs all your life and then getting plucked, stuffed and roasted is good enough for you, is it?

Babs: It’s a livin’.

Recently, I have been hearing a great many business owners expressing the dire need for employees who “think on their feet” regarding the jobs they were hired to do. These business owners are dumbfounded and frustrated at the fact that their employees (most of whom are long since out of high school) take no initiative and will not think beyond the immediate task at hand, as if they are working from a script and have no thoughts or words beyond that.

More and more, business owners are faced with a workforce who is looking to be told what to do at every turn. Perhaps it has to do with the fact that the generations of children that have grown up being shuffled from one scheduled activity to another, constantly told what happens next, what to do, and how to do it are becoming the bulk of the people in the workforce at large. Perhaps it has to do with the way the corporate world has functioned for the past several decades – where employees are told that their input matters and are encouraged to contribute, yet penalized in a variety of ways when they do contribute. This experience leaves the workforce to interpret this message as proof that the only way to move forward is to put one’s head down and wait for the next instruction.

Battery Operated Toy Robot

Regardless of how we got this way, it is critical for us to break out of this prison, taking the initiative to risk change. With the economy in the state it is currently, people are afraid to make waves and risk losing their jobs. Believe me when I say, “I’ve been there. I understand”. The problem that arises because everyone takes this point of view is that things never stay the way they are, they only get worse. We simply get used to the new norm and tell ourselves that things are the same. This is what Ginger the chicken in the movie Chicken Run is trying to get her fellow inmates to see. The quote referenced at the beginning of this article was prompted by Ginger recognizing the signs that something much worse was on the horizon for them.

For those of you who have never seen the movie, I not only recommend you watch it (if only for the pure entertainment value), but I will summarize the plot for you. Ginger is a chicken living on a chicken farm that is run like a prison camp (think Stalag 17 meets Hogan’s Heroes). Ginger’s only thought is to break free of the tyranny and live a free life, beyond the hills – with grass and sunshine; with the freedom to live the life she decides, the freedom from fear, boredom, and abuse. Her difficulty, and challenge, is in trying to convince the other chickens on the farm that the way things are is not how they were meant to be – that there is a better, happier way of living. Ginger could easily escape on her own, she had done it many times, but she cares enough about the other chickens that she will not escape unless they all can.

In the quote above, Ginger is asking her fellow chicken inmates to think beyond the mechanical routine that leads to, in their case actual death. In the case of so many people in the working world/Corporate America, this life leads to a broken spirit and emotional death. Ginger is trying to connect with the thinking part of her fellow chickens to open them up to their reality as well as the possibilities that are available to them if they would only think about events as they unfold and take the risks necessary to obtain this new life of freedom.

So too the contemporary business owner.

This begs the question, “How does one get beyond this mentality in order to create happy, thinking individuals who take in the whole scenario, process it according to what is right to do in the situation, and take the initiative to go ahead and DO what needs to be done?”

Consciousness is the key.

As an employer, you have to be conscious of your own work habits and the example you are setting. I once worked for a woman who hounded her underlings (yes, that is how she thought of us) to be productive and would publicly scold and berate us if she walked by and we happened to be taking a breath because, in her eyes, we were slacking. Her behavior created extreme resentment in her staff because her workday consisted of nothing but slacking (i.e.; complaining about all of the e-mails she had to go through and that she had no time to deal with them. In the meantime she would spend 90% of the time she was not in meetings texting or telephoning her friends and family).  This same woman would consistently change the essence of the tasks she delegated without telling us, then berate us for failing at the task. The behavior that she was modeling was creating an atmosphere of insecurity and instability which resulted in our running to her for every detail and instruction so that she couldn’t say we didn’t do what she wanted. We stopped thinking for ourselves because, our manager’s behavior told us to, regardless of what words she used.

You also, as an employer, need to be conscious of the reason you are passionate about your business. Recently I spoke with a business owner who could not do this. He could not tell me why he devoted his life, sacrificing time with his family, to doing what he does (which he clearly loves doing). In order to be able to project your passion to your employees or colleagues, you must be able to express the Why behind the What. Oftentimes, employees do not care about their work because they cannot see the point to it. They interpret their boss’ passion as obsessiveness or inability to be satisfied. The result is that employees give up trying to satisfy their employers because their efforts will be wasted since their employers will let them know that the work should have been done better.

Another area employers need to be conscious of is the effectiveness of the training system in place. One business owner I spoke with recently had nothing in place beyond the functional aspects of the job. The new hires were essentially thrown to the wolves on the first day to be trained “on the fly” with all of their mistakes quite public. Additionally, since they were not trained in how to work with their customers, they had an overwhelming feeling of inadequacy and humiliation so they, again, ran to the owner for instructions on the minutest task. The employees are afraid to remember anything because, “What if I get it wrong in front of everyone?” This business owner does not realize that he has created a system of failure for his employees because he has not given any thought to the type and style of the training he is providing to his staff. This business owner does not realize the effect that not caring about the training program he puts in place has on

  1. the morale of his employees (“He doesn’t give a hoot ‘n a holler about us so why should we care about him or his stupid job?”),
  2. the way they treat his clients,
  3. the cost of continually replacing employees (monetary cost as well as time and effort), or
  4. his Bottom Line.

As employees, you need to be conscious of not falling into the prison of numbing your mind and stifling your abilities. You need to be conscious of taking risks to make change happen. You need to be conscious of the most effective ways to communicate your needs to your employer or manager in order to clear away the barbed wire surrounding your workplace chicken farm.

Again, I know from whence I speak. I have been a culprit of each of these errors in thinking and have learned the hard way that staying silent, trying to adjust to a new level of abuse or dysfunction does not change any circumstance for the better. It allows, and in fact encourages, circumstances to get worse. Therefore, if you are unhappy in your job, ask yourself why. When you arrive at an answer, ask yourself why you feel that way. Continue asking yourself why until you reach the core of the problem. If there is anything you are at fault with and can improve on, do so. Once you know the core of the problem, you will be able to find a way to properly address the situation.

For example, if you find that the core of your dissatisfaction at work is that you feel that you are afraid to try or to think on your own because you have gotten the message that you will surely fail in the eyes of your employer/Manager(as in the case of the business owner above who was passionate about his work yet came across as impossible to please), then talk with your employer/Manager about this. By stating your case in terms that do not blame your employer/Manager, yet bring out the fact that you feel you are not able to perform to your best because of how you are made to feel and that you simply want to clear up any misunderstandings and expectations, you will go far in effecting the necessary changes that will allow you to do your best and love what you do.

If each person begins to make small changes, sooner or later great changes are made. I think you will find that sooner is sooner than you think.

Until the next time, I send you all my best wishes.

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Copyright © 2012 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS 

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

Think Tank Tuesday – V1;N3 – Listening and Learning

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Today we think about the critical role that listening plays in our ability to serve those around us. Take time today to think about how well you truly listen to what people are saying, remembering that listening involves more than physically hearing the words that are spoken to you.

Listening involves observing and processing the physical and environmental cues that are being sent to you as well as keeping yourself clear of any hidden agendas you may have set in place for the outcome you are hoping to elicit.

Listening involves learning from past encounters with a person as to how he or she processes information, or the manner in which he or she communicates. Perhaps a person needs only the critical pieces of information in order to come to a decision. Some people need every gory detail to arrive at the same conclusion. Others need time and physical space in order to process, while still others need to work out a solution on their own before to be certain that he or she had fully grasped the situation.

The list is as endless as the stars in the sky because there are so many factors that go into the communication between people. This means that each person needs to remember that what works for us most likely will not work for the person with whom we are communicating.

Finally, do not underestimate the power of your personal agenda for a particular communication to completely destroy effective communication. The presence of an agenda inherently denies communication because the agenda is, in fact, the outcome, therefore, there is no communication. Oftentimes we are not aware that an agenda exists, so when communication breaks down, we are dumbfounded and become frustrated, attributing the breakdown to the other person or people involved.

Paying attention, clearing out all ulterior motives, remembering what we have seen and experienced, and learning to work with the needs of the person in front of us will take the act of communication you are currently experiencing, to a higher level. 

Until the next time, I send you all my best wishes.

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Copyright © 2013 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

Motivational Monday – V2:N3 – Leading By Example

Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.

– Albert Schweitzer –

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Until the next time, I wish you all my best.

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Copyright, 2013 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

Focus Friday – V2:N2 – Effective Relationship Development with Local Business Owners

Welcome to “Focus Friday”. You are here because you are looking to dramatically improve your Client Relationship skills and are looking for focus for the upcoming week.

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As we reflect upon the week just past, and look to the week ahead, focus on where your relationships stand with other business owners in your area (or other department heads, etc.). Are your dealings with them cordial, frigid, or warm and friendly?  REMEMBER: How you interact with your colleagues and compatriots has a tremendous effect on your ability to do your job and move forward in your business. Keeping your relationships well maintained will catapult you to the success you desire.

Until the next time, I send you all my best wishes.

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Copyright © 2013 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

Thank You Thursday – V2:N2 – Challenges

Man Concentrating

Welcome to this week’s issue of “Thank You Thursday”. I hope this issue finds that you are well. Today, think about all the challenges you have faced this past week, be it a difficult client, a project that was delayed or derailed, or a week where nothing really seemed to fall into place as easily as it should have. As you review these situations, think about the good things that happened because of, or in spite of, the challenge you were faced with.

Take the time to develop gratitude around the positive events that resulted from the negative events. For example; I recently had difficulty in sending a simple e-mail to a client. The result was that I was forced to look at the e-mail more closely which revealed an error that I was able to correct before the client had seen it. Therefore, an apparent problem actually was a protection for which I am grateful.

Once you begin on the path of gratitude for challenges, you will find that you will no longer see challenges, only opportunities for betterment.

Until the next time, I send you all my best wishes.

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Copyright, 2013. All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

Think Tank Tuesday – V1;N2 – The Power of Leadership

Power vs. Leadership

In honor of the various Presidents whose Birthdays we celebrate this month, great men and great leaders who truly took their positions seriously, with a full understanding of tremendous responsibility that was placed upon their shoulders to lead an entire nation of people, caring for the welfare of each and all, I think it àpropos to take a solid look at the attitude we have regarding our own positions of leadership.

Are we truly trying to lead the people we are responsible for or are we more concerned about the power we possess? Are we striving to become truly great leaders, or have we become bullies who take pleasure in controlling others and showing our importance through blustering? As this newest February comes to a close in a few short weeks, let’s take this time to grow into our own, personal Oval Office being ever mindful of the privilege and the responsibility that accompanies it. If we feel as though we are lacking the skills or training to handle the responsibility, find a way to obtain the missing components. By becoming a great leader who is focused on bringing out the best in and providing the best for the people in our charge, we create a highly motivated, hard-working team who gives their all for the welfare of all. I can’t think of a more rewarding way to spend the day.

Until the next time, I send you all my best wishes.

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Copyright © 2013 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.

Focus Friday – Volume 2;Number 1 – Passion

I hope this first Focus Friday edition of the New Year finds that you are well. In the wake of St. Valentine’s Day, our focus is on our passion for the work we do.

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Whether or not you are in your Dream Job/Career, take some time between now and Monday to look closely at the work you do and write out the areas that you truly love working at, then write out why you feel this way. By doing this every day for the next week, you will begin to see your job in a different light and you will begin to reflect this change in the work you do.

Until the next time, I send you all my best wishes.

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Copyright, 2013 – Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS

All rights reserved. It is strictly prohibited to copy, redistribute, republish or modify any materials or software contained on the cerossiterpcs.com website or in subsequent support without the prior written consent of Cathleen E. Rossiter, PCS.